MUSEUM DER DINGE/MUSEUM OF THINGS: SHARDS-SCHERBEN. 641 OBJECTS WITHOUT QUALITIES

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n May 1945, Berlin lay in ruins. 770,000 houses had been destroyed or made uninhabitable: the streets were heaped with rubble and ash. An outing to one of Berlin’s fourteen official rubble hills or Trümmerberge offfers just a vague impression of the huge amount of debris that covered the city – about 75 million cubic meter. From 1945 to 1958, everything that had been destroyed and could not be recycled was transported to the hills by rubble railways. These mounds of rubble also fundamentally reshaped and became an integral part of the city’s new topography. As grass grew over them, and trees and shrubs covered the top layer of rubble, the hills remained silently admonishing witnesses. Today, almost 70 years after the war, the artificial landscapes that were created, have mostly become parks, offering both recreation and panoramic views of the city. With time, however, erosion and uprooted trees uncover one relic after another. Sonya Schönberger and Christof Zwiener are both Berlin-based artists who have turned the search for traces of the city’s past into a passionate mission. Shown for the first time , a sober installation at the Museum Der Dinge shows 641 small fragments of everyday ceramic objects and glass ustensils, found on Berlin’s hills of World War II rubble, orderly spread over a series of tables, and combined with some of the museum’s ‘Things after Disaster’ collection – as a metaphor for the museum in general, incorporating shards of time and memory. Through March 3 2014 (mb) http://www.museumderdinge.de/

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